Snowflake Boot Cuff Crochet Pattern

Snowflake Boot Cuff Crochet Pattern
Snowflake Boot Cuff Crochet Pattern

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Snowflake Boot Cuff Crochet Pattern

When I was working on the Snowflake Boot Cuff Crochet Pattern design, I decided that I wanted something a little out of the ordinary.  As I sat down to work, my daughter sang along with Disney’s Frozen.  I instantly knew what I wanted to do.  I ran upstairs and grabbed my brightest white yarn.  When I was finished, I knew I’d been successful.  My daughter looked wouldn’t take them off all day because, “I feel like Elsa,” she proclaimed.  This was probably one our best ever photo shoots, and I just wish I could put all one hundred pictures on this post.

The Written Snowflake Boot Cuff Crochet Pattern

This pattern is written in US crochet terms.

Materials

  • 4 Ply, worsted weight acrylic yarn (shown in Red Heart Super Saver)
  • Yarn needle
  • Crochet hook size J10/6.0mm

Gauge and Size

Gauge is not completely necessary for this pattern.  One size will fit most children between 6 months and 5T.  To increase or decrease the size, you may add or subtract six chains and hdcs wherever counts are noted to have enough stitches for the edging.

Extra Tips

You can change the way the rounds are joined and started to fit your preference.  Some may choose to use an invisible or slanted joining method.  You could also continue in rounds without using a slip stitch as long as your last round has a count divisible by six for the edging, IE: 18, 24, 30, etc.  You may use whatever colors you prefer or have on hand.  This pattern is great for using up any scraps you might have in your stash.  If you have any questions while completing this pattern, please feel free to email me at clrinaldi1989@gmail.com.

Stitches Used

Ch, sc, dc, hdc, sl st

Abbreviations

Ch=chain, sc=single crochet, hdc=half double crochet, dc=double crochet, sl st=slip stitch, st(s)=stitch(es), sk st(s)=skip stitch(es), sp=space

Instructions

Round 1: With blue, ch 24, join with sl st in first ch, ch 2 (counts as first hdc), hdc in each ch around, join with sl st in top of first hdc (24 hdc).

Round 2-5: Ch 2 (counts as first hdc), hdc in each hdc around, sl st in top of first hdc (24 hdc).

Fasten off blue and join with white in first hdc.

Round 6: Ch 1, sc in same st, *ch 2, sk next 2 hdc, 3 dc in next hdc, ch 2, sk next 2 hdc, sc in next hdc, reapeat from * around, join with a sl st in first sc. See figure 1.

Round 7: Ch 5 (counts as first dc, ch 2), *(sc, ch 3, sc) in sp between first and second dc (see figures 2 and 3), ch 5, (sc, ch 3, sc) in sp between second and third dc (see figure 4), ch 2, dc in next sc, ch 2, repeat from * around, join with a sl st in first dc (third ch from beginning ch 5) fasten off.

Weave in all ends with yarn needle.

Figure 1
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 4

 

©Knotted Mom 2015

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Crocheting in the Car

Crocheting in the Car - Knotted Mom

Crocheting in the Car

Some people are able to just grab their things and go and are not extremely concerned about particulars when it comes to crocheting in the car.  I, on the other hand, can only work on certain projects.  I’m very particular about what yarn I’m using, the hooks I have on hand, and other tools we often need (and let’s not forget about a way to store all of the previously mentioned goodies).  If you have never worked on a project while traveling, you may want to start.  It can help fight off boredom and reduce stress.  In the rest of this article, I’ll review all of my tips to make crocheting in the car, bus,boat, train, plane, submarine, or whatever your means of transportation worthwhile.  Oh, and one other thing to mention before we get started, please don’t crochet while you are the one driving.  Make sure to use your DDC (Designated Driver for Crocheting).  The rest of what I say in the following is all just suggestions and what works best for me.

Why You Should Try Crocheting in the Car

Do you have anxiety about road conditions or other drivers?  If you answered yes, crocheting in the car can be just what you need to distract you from your surroundings.  It gives you something to repeat, which releases a happy endorphin, ultimately calming your nerves.  If you get bored on long trips but don’t enjoy readying, crocheting could be something for you to do to keep yourself from the doldrums.

Types of Projects

This one may apply to some and not to others, but for myself this has been a very good rule to follow.  I get very distracted while on the road.  I like to look at the scenery, my husband and I like to chat, and my kids always need something right when I get going.  Due to these reasons, it’s better for me to work on a project that is on a beginner or easy skill level.  If the pattern has a lot of counting or different directions for every row or round, forget it.  It’s not happening.  So that virus shawl and that graphgan will just have to wait their turn.  If you’re not like me, meaning you can actually pay attention to what you’re working on and don’t have little ones asking, “Are we there yet,” a million times, than you could probably disregard this whole section and work on whatever your heart desires.

Supplies for Crocheting in the Car

Yarn and Hooks

The first thing I tend to look at is my yarn since that determines the majority of the rest of your supplies.  Working with crochet thread is not recommended due to the strain on your eyes.  I get dizzy just thinking about it.  The same goes for any yarn in the color black or other very dark colors.  Trust me, you will need to rest your eyes a whole lot if you want to attempt this daring feat.  I find that a thicker yarn is easier to work with, which leads me to hooks.  The bigger, the better.  No sound is worse than the clanking of that size F hook rolling down under the seat, and nothing will agitate you more than trying to retrieve that thin little hook from the floor while you’re going down the highway.  Something with a comfort grip will come in handy as well.  If you’re like me, when you try to get comfortable after sitting in the same seat for hours, you might put your arms in strange positions that can make you use your wrists and arms differently.  A lighted hook can also do wonders for you eyes and make sure your project turns out perfectly.  You can buy lighted crochet hooks from Amazon.  They might make working with darker colors more tolerable.

Extras

Scissor safety is one of the most important things to me.  If we were ever in a wreck and one of us were injured by my crafting scissors, I would never forgive myself.  I tend to leave those at home and instead opt for ones with blunt tips.  If for some reason I decide to bring my crafting ones, which are super-pointy and razor sharp, I stick them safely in the glove box.  You might also need a needle to weave in your tails.  I recommend bringing a blunt one and putting it somewhere that doesn’t give it the opportunity to roll away.  Another item I frequently recommend is a headlamp.  No, you’re not going to crochet in a cave (but if you really are, please tell me all about it).  If your driver is like mine, then the map lights or reading lights are out of the question.  Just make sure you remember to turn your light off before you turn your head in his or her direction, so you don’t potentially blind them.

Storage Suggestions for Crocheting in the Car

You can really go with whatever makes you the most comfortable with this topic.  If you keep your car really clean, I envy you you may not really worry if your yarn falls on the floor.  I leave my yarn in a bag that opens at the top, like a tote or 31 bag, and work from the center or the skein or leave enough room for the ball to roll around a bit.  This keeps it from getting covered in leaves and other dirt (and probably gum from the bottom of my boots or a half-eaten lollipop from the bank drive thru).  This is also the reason I recommend working with smaller projects while traveling.  There’s less of a chance that your work will become soiled, and less chance of unwanted frogging.  It’s also a great idea to have a storage solution that gives you different places to keep things separated.  I have a round caddy from 31 that has a flat bottom and pockets the entire way around.  C’est parfait!

Summary

I hope all of the tips and suggestions I provided were helpful.  Do you have a favorite project to crochet on the go?  I’d love to hear about it in the comments below.  If you have anything to share that you think would help others interested in this topic, please comment that as well.  You never know, your comment on this article could help the next person that’s looking for advice about crocheting in the car.

Crochet Poncho Pattern for Girls

Crochet Poncho Pattern for Girls

Crochet Poncho Pattern for Girls

This crochet poncho pattern for girls features the mitered granny square and a beautiful fringe detail any little girl is sure to love twirling in.  This pattern could easily be made for an adult by adding another row or two to the bottom edge of the poncho and making the armholes and neckline larger.  Please note: this pattern is written in US crochet terms.

Materials

  • Crochet Hook Size H
  • Yarn Needle
  • Scissors
  • 4-ply Worsted Weight Acrylic Yarn (you will use roughly a medium ball of A and half a skein in each B and C)
    • A = Red Heart Super Saver in Baby Pink
    • B = Red Heart Super Saver in Flame
    • C = Red Heart Super Saver in Carrot
  • Tape Measure (if desired to check gauge and obtain exact measurement on tassels)

Gauge and Size

To check gauge, make a mitered granny square.  The square should measure five inches by five inches.  If your square is too small, go up a hook size, and if your square is too large go down a hook size.  This poncho pattern is intended to fit most children from around 12 months through size 7/8.

 

Extra Tips

Mitered granny squares do not have the same number of stitches on every side.  Keep this in mind when joining squares and stitch through selected stitches multiple times on the shorter sides of the squares to match up when sewing onto the larger sides of squares.

You can use a magic ring in the first steps of the mitered granny square in place of the directions to chain and form a ring.

The first two rounds of the mitered granny square are worked in rounds, and every row after that is worked in rows where you must turn your work.

To make the armholes, the pattern refers to left and right.  This is your left and right when you look at the piece, not the left and right of the wearer.

You may choose to weave in your ends as you go or leave them all to the end when you finish up your work.

Stitches Used

Chain, slip stitch, single crochet, double crochet, front post double crochet, back post double crochet, and double crochet two together

Abbreviations

Ch=chain, sl st=slip stitch, sc=single crochet, dc=double crochet, fpdc=front post double crochet, bpdc=back post double crochet, sk st=skip stitch, sp(s)=space(s), st(s)=stitch(es), dc 2 tog = double crochet two together

Instructions

Mitered Granny Square (make 16)

Round 1: With A ch 6, sl st in first ch to form a ring, ch 3 (counts as first dc here and throughout), 2 dc into ring, ch 2, *3 dc, ch 2, repeat from * 2 times, sl st in top of ch 3. (4 groups of 3 dcs and 4 ch-2 sps)

Round 2: sl st in next two dc and into first ch-2 sp, ch 3, (2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) into same ch-2 sp, ch 2, *(3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc, ch 2) into next ch-2 sp, repeat from * 2 times, sl st into top of ch 3, fasten off.  (8 groups of 3 dc and 8 ch-2 sps)

Row 1: Join with B in any corner ch-2 sp, ch 3, 2 dc into same ch-2 sp, ch 2, 3 dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 2, (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) into next corner ch-2 sp, ch 2, 3 dc into next ch-2 sp, ch 2, 3 dc in next corner ch-2 sp, turn.  (6 groups of 3 dc and 5 ch-2 sps)

Row 2: Ch 5 (counts as first dc, ch 2), *3 dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 2, repeat from * 1 time, (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in next ch-2 sp, ch 2, **3 dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 2, repeat from ** 1 time, dc in last dc of row 1, turn, fasten off.  (6 groups of 3 dc, 7 ch-2 sps, and 2 single dcs)

Row 3: With C join in first ch-2 sp, ch 3, 2 dc in same ch-2 sp, ch 2, *3 dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 2, repeat from * 1 time, (3dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in next ch-2 space, **ch 2, 3 dc in next ch-2 sp, repeat from ** 2 times, turn.  (8 groups of 3 dc and 7 ch-2 sps)

Row 4: Ch 5 (counts as first dc, ch 2), *3 dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 2, repeat from * 2 times, (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in next ch-2 sp, ch 2, **3 dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 2, repeat from ** 2 times, dc in last dc of row 3, fasten off.

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Mitered Granny Square

Assembly

Assemble squares by sewing together a front and back panel, each consisting of 8 squares.  Sew the front and back panels together from the shoulder down to the elbow (refer to figure 1 for square placement and seaming guidelines)

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Construction

Neckline

Round 1: With C join in any st, ch 1, sc in same st, 1 sc in each dc and ch around, sl st to first sc.

Round 2: Ch 2, *dc 2 tog in next two sc, repeat from * around, sl st in top of ch 2, fasten off.

Bottom Edge Foundation: With B join in any st along bottom edge of poncho, ch 1, sc in same st, 1 sc in each dc and ch around, sl st in first sc, fasten off.

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Neckline

Left Armhole

Round 1: With B join in sc closest to shoulder seam, ch 3 (counts as first dc, dc in next 19 sts (working on front panel), (here you will begin working into the back panel) dc into sc 20 sts from shoulder seam on back panel, dc into next 19 sts, sl st in ch 3.  (40 dc)

Round 2: Ch 3, *fpdc in next dc, bpdc in next dc, repeat from * around, sl st in top of ch 3.  (40 dc)

Right Armhole: Complete as left armhole but begin in back panel and end in front panel.

Round 3: Ch 3, *fpdc in next fpdc, bpdc, in next bpdc, repeat from * around, sl st in top of ch 3, fasten off.  (40 dc)

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Armholes

Fringe

Cut yarn in lengths of 12 inches.  With four strands of yarn, create fringe on bottom edge of poncho.  Place tassels about half of an inch apart.  You can choose to cut tassels to even out the strands perfectly or leave them uneven.

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Finishing Details

Downloadable Crochet Poncho Pattern for Girls

You can download a printer-friendly version here: Crochet Poncho Pattern for Girls

Crochet Boot Cuff Pattern

knotted mom
Crochet Boot Cuff Pattern
Crochet Boot Cuff Pattern

Crochet Boot Cuff Pattern

This is the first crochet boot cuff pattern I ever wrote, and it is one of the items pictured in Knotted Mom’s feature photo.  This boot cuff pattern has been thoroughly tested and is perfect for beginners searching for a first clothing item to crochet.  The sizing for this pattern is designed to fit most children, but there are changes included with the stitch multiple for larger sizes.  Feel free to share pictures of your completed boot cuffs below!  If you’d like to purchase these boot cuffs handmade by me please visit my Etsy shop or email me at clrinaldi1989@gmail.com.

The Pattern

Please note: this pattern is written in US crochet terms.

Materials

1 Ball Red Heart Super Saver (or similar acrylic yarn) in desired color

Hook G/6 – 4.25 mm

Yarn needle

Gauge

Finished product should be 4.25 inches wide and 3.25 inches tall from bottom to highest point when following the original size provided.

Size

One size fits most 12 months-5t, changes provided to customize your size.

Boot Cuff Sizing Chart
Adult Size Guidelines for Boot Cuffs/Leg Warmers

Stitches Used

Ch, sl st, sc, dc

Abbreviations

Ch = chain, slst = slip stich, sc = single crochet, dc = double crochet, st(s) = stitch(es), sp(s) = space(s), * = repeat whatever follows as indicated

Instructions

Pattern is worked in multiples of four.  To create a boot cuff perfectly sized for you, create a chain that will wrap completely around your leg where the top of your boot ends.  Add the number of chains needed to have a multiple of 4 (28, 32, 36, 40, etc)

Foundation: Ch 32, slst in first ch to form a ring.

Round 1: Ch 3 (counts as first dc here and throughout), dc into next ch and each ch around, sl st in top of beginning ch 3 (32 dc)

Rounds 2-3: Ch 3, dc in each ch around, slst in top of ch 3 (32 dc)

Round 4: Ch 4 (counts as first dc, ch 1), *sk next st, dc in next st, ch 1, repeat from * around, sl st in third ch of beginning ch 4 (16 dc and 16 ch-1 sps)

Round 5: Ch 8 (counts as first sl st, ch 7), *sk next ch, dc, and following ch, sl st in next dc, ch 7, repeat from * around, sl st in first ch from beginning ch 8 (8 ch-7 sps)

Round 6: Sl st into ch-7 sp, ch 1 (does not count as first sc), 7 sc in each ch-7 sp around, sl st in first sc, finish off.  (56 sc)

Use yarn needle to weave in all ends.

You can download a printer-friendly version here Crochet Boot Cuff Pattern

Julia modeling this crochet boot cuff pattern
Julia modeling this crochet boot cuff pattern